Posts Tagged ‘design’

The Art and History of Traditional Fashion in Mexico

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Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

A few days ago I went to a temporary exhibition in Mexico City with approximately 100 public and private collections of traditional Mexican clothing. I enjoyed seeing the more than 225 mannequins and 400 items from clothing, accessories, designs, painting and photographies. It’s the first time I encountered an exhibition in Mexico about fashion and textiles featuring so many indigenous cultures from around the country. In that small space I walked through 75 years of history of Mexican fashion! Can you imagine? It was really inspiring.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

These amazing traditional garments speak for themselves. I love seeing the colors, the intricate, majestic embroidery designs, and botanical inspiration. I saw pieces of the different indigenous Mexican cultures like the otomí, purépecha, totonaca, huasteca, nahua, amuzgo o huichol, maya, tzotzil, mazahua and some modern mixed pieces, like the traditional China Poblana and charro, quechquemitls and shawls.

Here some traditional garments from around Mexico:

FAJAS

The fajas are accessories that hold skirts, pants and tangles, and its function is similar to that of a belt. These garments are typical of Zinacantan, Chiapas. The production of one of these last approximately a month! The fajas are not just adorned with detailed embroidery shapes, they tell fascinating stories. The mothers of the community weave in them about their children, their sacred animals and many other important events in their lives.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

HUIPIL

A traditional huipil (huipilli in Nahuatl) consists of a rectangular cloth, folded in half, with an opening for the head. This dress is related to the indigenous and mestizo part of southern Mexico and Central America, it is commonly used in the Yucatan Peninsula.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

QUECHQUEMITL

Quechquémitl, Nahuatl word that means tip neck. This garment production technique dates back to pre-Hispanic times. Proudly originally from Mexico, they are mainly produced in the State of Mexico using wool, and in Puebla, Veracruz, San Luis Potosi and Hidalgo using cotton. They are produced by different cultures around Mexico, as the Otomí, Huasteca, Totonac, Mayan and Nahua, and each culture have their own  embroidery techniques, material and color palette that makes them unique.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

 

SARAPE, GABAN OR JORONGO 

Interestingly, the serape was created just to dressed the men of the community. Not until now, that is had become so popular, it has been adapted for women. This traditional garment has different names, Sarape, gaban and jorongo, depending on the Mexican state where it’s created. It’s similar to the ponchos used in South America. It’s produced mainly in the State of Mexico and Saltillo with wool, cotton and sometimes with applications of gold, silver and silk.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

 

Some of my favorite pieces:

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Huipil with petticoat created by Florentina López de Jesús. Cotton yarn in natural color and coyuchi, taffeta fabrics ligaments and supplementary weft. Poplin tailored skirt. From Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Traje de mujer cora. Popelina de algodón estampada, con aplicaciones de listones de satén de acetato liso y bordado con hilazas comerciales en punto de saten. From Santa Teresa de Nayar, Nayarit, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Indumentaria antigua nahua, 1950. Cotton and linen fabrics with taffeta ligament in waist loom: real point embroidered with silk threads and applications bar. From Amatlán de los Reyes, Veracruz, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Indumentaria tradicional huasteca, 1970. Tangle industrial fabric: cotton belt and acrylic yarn woven belt: satin blouse made with machine: quechquemitl embroidery cross stitch checkered table with acrylic yarn, worsted acrylic petob – tocado -: backpack embroidered cotton blanket and glass bead necklace. From Tancanhuitz Santos, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

 

We love to know more about textiles from around the world, and we are lucky to get to see many of the work created by communities and cultures from around Mexico, since we get to travel around the country very often. There is something about the history of textiles and prints that I find fascinating, maybe the fact that everything has an important and special meaning. Do you love textiles as much as we do?

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Talking about Inspiration with Nika Martinez

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Celebrating color with Nika Martinez. Surface Pattern Designer  | Live Colorful

I meet Nika through a creative class we took together a few years ago. We connected quickly and started sharing tips about life, business and creativity. Since we met, I have been wanted to share more about her work. I’m a huge fan of her intricate and powerful designs. I owned one of her gorgeous phone case designs and I’m a huge fan of her mandalas prints and cool jewelry design.

Nika Martinez is a surface pattern designer in love with design and colors. She studied photography, but somehow fell in love with patterns. That’s when everything started. Now her designs can be found in many products, such as homeware, electronic devices, fashion and stationery products.

In case you have never heard of this creative field, a surface pattern designer is someone who licences artwork to companies to place on products such as textiles, homeware, toys, jewelry, shoes, clothing, tech accessories, etc.

Celebrating color with Nika Martinez. Surface Pattern Designer  | Live Colorful

I wanted to asked her a few question about her daily routine, inspiration and of course, favorite color combination so you get to know her better and you get to know more about the life behind cool creative people like her. Enjoy!

Where do you find inspiration for your designs?

A lot of my inspiration comes from my mediterranean culture and it’s variety of influences. I can say that we are a mix of beautiful cultures. I’ve also always been curious about other ethnicities. I like to use that bold inspiration and influences and mix them together in my own designs.

I get inspired by Mallorcan textiles, blankets from Alpujarras, Morocco, and therefore by other indigenous cultures, especially from the women of these cultures, that inspire joy, strength and character, a mixture of wild innocence, independent women.

 

What’s your favorite color combination?

Orange, pink, purple and mint. I used these colors in one of my favorite designs, my native bandana.

 

How is a normal day in Nika’s life?

I have really organized weekdays. I get up very early, at 7.30 am. I have breakfast, read mails, check out Facebook, Twitter, Keep.com, Pinterest and Wanelo. I answer emails and write down in my diary the list of “to do” things for the  day. Ok, I usually do that the day before, but there is always something to add or remove in the morning as well. Then I take some art classes and I work until 5 pm. I eat something quick while watching a tutorial or socialize on Facebook. From 5 pm to 9.30 pm I’m dedicated to things around the house and my girls. Then I have dinner while I try to study something or take a course until I get sleepy. If I have a deadline, I continue working on that.

I’m usually pretty busy, I guess. But weekends are sacred for me. I love going to the beach, especially during summer. I need make space in my agenda to practice yoga or some kind of meditation, the body is asking me for that!

 

Nika loves to collaborate with other artists and companies, so if you have a project in mind just drop her an email to: [email protected]

Find out more about her work on her website. You can also find her on Instagram.
Do you know someone in a creative field that would love to share more about his/her life? We want Live Colorful to be a place where others find inspiration and support, so please send us an email at [email protected].We would love to feature more about their work and products!

Travel More and Take Better Pictures …

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About traveling more and taking better pictures | LiveColorful.com

Just after we moved to California from North Carolina we decided that we weren’t made to live in the city, San Francisco. Instead we looked for a quiet area, that was close enough to drive to the beach, mountains and city any time we wanted. Of course, as good hermits, we rarely actually leave our quiet area. We love the suburban feel in the parks and farmers markets near our home. But from time to time, we get to experience the beauty of San Francisco, the tall buildings and the interesting variety of personalities in the people crossing the streets. The vibe is pretty unique.

I went to the city just last night to an event, a blog party workshop in the PicsArt offices to get to know more about Spot, PicsArt and PunkPost. I love these kind of events because I get to meet new bloggers and get to chat with old blogger friends from the area.

About traveling more and taking better pictures | LiveColorful.com

I really enjoyed some tips about traveling and photography that they shared in the workshop, especially the ones about how to take better lifestyle pictures from the places we visit:

  • Play with color. Look at objects and people in contrast to their surroundings.
  • Frame your shot. The rule of thirds is a photo go to, but not the only option.
  • Photographing interiors. Shot straight on not at an angle. Try to avoid rooms full of people. Focus on smaller vignettes: a beautiful piece of furniture or gallery art wall.

I also got to know more about these apps, PicsArt, PunkPost, Spot. They are quite helpful and fun, check them out and see if you like them.

  • PicsArt. A great app for daily inspiration, photo editing tools that will give a professional look to your images and a community to nurture your creativity.
  • PunkPost. is about love, connection and snail mail. You can send handwritten cards as quick as texting!
  • Spot. This is great for anyone that would like to explore more about their city, restaurants, touristic attractions and get inspiration and recommendations from friends and experts you trust.

About traveling more and taking better pictures | LiveColorful.com

The chat from yesterday inspired me to drive farther from home and visit new places every week. I want to indulge myself with better food, indie products and good coffee from the places surrounding me. It’s something I love to do, but never make time to do. You might know about this feeling. I’ll be sharing these adventures through snapchat, so follow along at livecolorfulco. I might continue for a few months until, well, my hermit heart invades me again and I feel like staying close to home all the time again. You might know about this feeling too, am I right?