Posts Tagged ‘world of color’

What Are the Traditional Colors of the Day of the Dead?

Posted by

El Día de los Muertos se celebra de muchas maneras diferentes alrededor del mundo, pero la esencia suele ser la misma. Lo que hace especial esta tradición es dedicar esos días a recordar a nuestros difuntos con amor, cariño y muchos colores! Descubre algunas formas de incorporar esta bonita fiesta con toda tu familia. | LiveColorful.com/es

Celebrate the departed with an ofrenda is a very old Mexican tradition that had passed from generation to generation. It goes back to approximately 1800 years B.C., when it was customary to bury the dead with offerings that include jewelry, crafts, food, beverages and some of their favorite personal items.

The tradition has evolved over the years, and every community in Mexico has adopted different features of the festival. That’s why you’ll find many variations of Día de los Muertos in colors, meanings and elements of the altars.

We have learned about the tradition from my Grandparents that grew up in Mexico City. We also adopted elements from Tabasco, Mexico, where we grew up.

I think our favorite part of the tradition is its complexity, and the opportunity to be creative when decorating the altar or ofrenda. We also love the fact that even when Day of the Dead sounds like a sad tradition, is celebrated in a joyful and colorful way! The reason is that in most Mesoamerican cultures death did not represent the end of life, but the beginning of a new way to exist.

The traditional colors of Dia de los Muertos are bright, vibrant and cheerful. This colorful palette is created with the use of multicolored papel picado and lots of marigolds around the streets and cemeteries of all the cities in Mexico. 

Although the meaning of the colors for the ofrenda of Día de los Muertos may vary in each community, some of the most used and which characterize the tradition are:

YELLOW

It represents the power of light and life. It also evokes the sun, which in the Aztec tradition, it is believed to guided the souls of the dead. The traditional marigold flower is what adds this yellow color to the decorations.Marigold petals are also used to make pathways, to guide the dead to their ofrendas.

PURPLE

It represents the Christian mourning. When the Spaniards arrived in America in the sixteenth century, they brought similar celebrations to Dia de los Muertos, where the dead were remembered on All Saints’ Day. When they brought Christianity to Mexico, a syncretism that mixed European and pre-Hispanic traditions was born, creating the current Day of the Dead or Dia de los Muertos tradition and adding the purple color in the decorations symbolizing the Christian mourning.

BLACK

It refers to the pre hispanic religion and the Tlillan, the place of blackness, and Mictlan, the place of the dead.

WHITE

It means light, innocence and purity. It is also used as a representation of the sky.

The Art and History of Traditional Fashion in Mexico

Posted by

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

A few days ago I went to a temporary exhibition in Mexico City with approximately 100 public and private collections of traditional Mexican clothing. I enjoyed seeing the more than 225 mannequins and 400 items from clothing, accessories, designs, painting and photographies. It’s the first time I encountered an exhibition in Mexico about fashion and textiles featuring so many indigenous cultures from around the country. In that small space I walked through 75 years of history of Mexican fashion! Can you imagine? It was really inspiring.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

These amazing traditional garments speak for themselves. I love seeing the colors, the intricate, majestic embroidery designs, and botanical inspiration. I saw pieces of the different indigenous Mexican cultures like the otomí, purépecha, totonaca, huasteca, nahua, amuzgo o huichol, maya, tzotzil, mazahua and some modern mixed pieces, like the traditional China Poblana and charro, quechquemitls and shawls.

Here some traditional garments from around Mexico:

FAJAS

The fajas are accessories that hold skirts, pants and tangles, and its function is similar to that of a belt. These garments are typical of Zinacantan, Chiapas. The production of one of these last approximately a month! The fajas are not just adorned with detailed embroidery shapes, they tell fascinating stories. The mothers of the community weave in them about their children, their sacred animals and many other important events in their lives.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

HUIPIL

A traditional huipil (huipilli in Nahuatl) consists of a rectangular cloth, folded in half, with an opening for the head. This dress is related to the indigenous and mestizo part of southern Mexico and Central America, it is commonly used in the Yucatan Peninsula.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

QUECHQUEMITL

Quechquémitl, Nahuatl word that means tip neck. This garment production technique dates back to pre-Hispanic times. Proudly originally from Mexico, they are mainly produced in the State of Mexico using wool, and in Puebla, Veracruz, San Luis Potosi and Hidalgo using cotton. They are produced by different cultures around Mexico, as the Otomí, Huasteca, Totonac, Mayan and Nahua, and each culture have their own  embroidery techniques, material and color palette that makes them unique.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

 

SARAPE, GABAN OR JORONGO 

Interestingly, the serape was created just to dressed the men of the community. Not until now, that is had become so popular, it has been adapted for women. This traditional garment has different names, Sarape, gaban and jorongo, depending on the Mexican state where it’s created. It’s similar to the ponchos used in South America. It’s produced mainly in the State of Mexico and Saltillo with wool, cotton and sometimes with applications of gold, silver and silk.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

 

Some of my favorite pieces:

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Huipil with petticoat created by Florentina López de Jesús. Cotton yarn in natural color and coyuchi, taffeta fabrics ligaments and supplementary weft. Poplin tailored skirt. From Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Traje de mujer cora. Popelina de algodón estampada, con aplicaciones de listones de satén de acetato liso y bordado con hilazas comerciales en punto de saten. From Santa Teresa de Nayar, Nayarit, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Indumentaria antigua nahua, 1950. Cotton and linen fabrics with taffeta ligament in waist loom: real point embroidered with silk threads and applications bar. From Amatlán de los Reyes, Veracruz, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Above: Indumentaria tradicional huasteca, 1970. Tangle industrial fabric: cotton belt and acrylic yarn woven belt: satin blouse made with machine: quechquemitl embroidery cross stitch checkered table with acrylic yarn, worsted acrylic petob – tocado -: backpack embroidered cotton blanket and glass bead necklace. From Tancanhuitz Santos, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

 

We love to know more about textiles from around the world, and we are lucky to get to see many of the work created by communities and cultures from around Mexico, since we get to travel around the country very often. There is something about the history of textiles and prints that I find fascinating, maybe the fact that everything has an important and special meaning. Do you love textiles as much as we do?

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Traditional garments from different cultures around Mexico. The patterns and textiles are striking! | Live Colorful

Where Frida Kahlo Grew Up

Posted by

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Frida Kahlo is such an awesome character. If you follow us on Instagram, you might have already noticed that we’re a bit obsessed with her colorful portraits! We also love Coyoacan, the neighborhood where she grew up.

Coyoacan is where you can find the famous Frida Kahlo Museum aka La casa Azul.

The word Coyoacán comes from the Nahuatl “Coyohuacan” that means “place of coyotes”. It’s rich in history, art and beautiful architecture. If you get to visit it someday, you will find bright colored homes, papel picado in the streets, art galleries and mercaditos where you can buy handmade dolls, jewelry, pottery and other neat knick knacks.

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Since Frida Kahlo was born on July 6 of 1907, we decided to use it as an excuse to celebrate her with a post. We didn’t want to write about La Casa Azul, since you already can find tons of images about the museum online.

Instead, I took my camera and walked through some of the streets that are near the Casa Azul.

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Something I learned from a current exhibit about Coyoacan history, it’s that thanks to its beauty, Coyoacan was were the first council of La Nueva España was established after the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlan (Mexico City). Franciscans and Dominicans were responsible for evangelizing the place and for that reason, beautiful baroque temples and shrines were built around the area.

I took some pictures of the place, so you can feel the vibe of the neighborhood. I looked for the oldest buildings, the ones that were there just when Frida Kahlo lived. I thought it was cool to see what she saw, and it was beautiful.

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live ColorfulCoyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live ColorfulHere more about Coyoacan and some local art galleries and museums: Coyoacan, a colorful spot in Mexico City.

Some DIY projects inspired by Frida Kahlo:

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful

Coyoacan, Mexico streets. Entre la casa azul de Frida Kahlo | Live Colorful